dangerismymiddlename.com Photos, Motorsport, Web

7Jan/131

Note to Self: Check Clearance BEFORE Opening Garage Door

2012 01 02 FAIL 512px Note to Self: Check Clearance BEFORE Opening Garage Door

Filed under: 1) Photos, Snapshots 1 Comment
4Jan/130

1 trailer 1 block 4 heads 32 studs, springs, valves, and circlips

April 21, 2012

2012 04 21 1 block 4 heads 32 springs valves and circlips 512px 1 trailer 1 block 4 heads 32 studs, springs, valves, and circlips

7Dec/120

My Contact Information Cards

2012 12 08 Business Cards 512px My Contact Information Cards

1Dec/120

Free CAT Scans

Here are my first two homemade CAT Scans. Impressive?

Cliff Bleszinski used to have a site called catscan.com. His fans would send him cat scanography, and he would post in on the site.

CAT scan Priti1 640x431 Free CAT Scans
.
CAT scan Boycat 640x464 Free CAT Scans

9Nov/120

Photos, Opinion, Information

 Photos, Opinion, Information

Images

RedBubble Gallery

See and print my photos at RedBubble.com (click).

This Website

Shared Videos

Motorcycles

Music

Words

Guest Writers

Motorcycle Safety

Motorcycles and Motorcycle Products

Motorsport

Computer Programming and Information Technology

The Bitbucket

15May/120

Yngwie Malmsteen Live, Tokyo, 1985

In 1984 I got to see these guys open for AC/DC.

  • At 4:23 the band starts.
  • The first guitar solo is at 6:07.
  • The keyboards and guitar do a high-speed Baroque-thing simultaneously at 9:55.
  • 35:00 is the beginning of I am a Viking. Watch that.
  • 44:47 begins an almost 10 minute long guitar solo.

Unfortunately the video's audio quality is not best, but you can still get the idea of what this was like.

They Were The Opening Act

Almost everyone came for AC/DC, and AC/DC brought everything they had:

  • Fake cannons? Check. (They sounded real, and fire shot out of them, until the cannons' amp blew a fuse, then it was quiet fire shooting out of them.)
  • Fake bells? Check.
  • Fake TNT? Yes.
  • Angus' school uniform. Yep.
  • Angus plays a solo off-the-stage, and in-the-crowd, on some guy's back? Check.

Yngwie Malmsteen's band's props? They have long hair, and he has a piece of tape on his guitar that says "PLAY LOUD" on it.

After That Concert They Were Off The Tour

Something really weird happened; after each AC/DC song there were fewer people in the stadium. The place was almost empty by the time Angus played his solo.

This was a time when Heavy Metal wasn't played on much of the radio. In my town, major bands played shows at a loss (according to a local union roady). The shows existed to sell records; these days the records exist to sell concert tickets.

There Was Magic At That Concert, And This Video Shows Us How The Magician Does Some Of It

Note: there are some guesses here. If you know more details, then please comment below.

He Played A Solo With His Teeth!

Yeah, but here we can see that he is actually using hammer-ons. There were no teeth harmed in the making of that solo.

His Feedback Moved Through Each Row Of The Crowd!

There appeared to be a standing wave that moved through the crowd from the front of the stage to the back, slowly. In the video, during that sound, the camera focused on the keyboard player. He was slowly twisting a potentiometer. A synthesizer can slowly change the pitch, in a more consistent way, than a guitar player can, but we were all looking at the guitar! (Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!)

This part is a guess. I can't tell the difference between a mode, where a standing wave creates more volume, and someone cranking up the volume when a specific note plays. One would need to make measurements in different places.

Then At One Point He Held The Guitar In A Specific Spot, And The Feedback Made It Sound Like A UFO!

In this video, Malmsteen holds up the guitar, then looks at the audience, then looks at the guitar. While we are all looking that the guitar (see 55:49), he tweaks a potentiometer on a piece of equipment (see 55:53). Maybe he was tweaking a digital delay.

Weird

We can see Moog Taurus Bass Pedals at the edge of the stage, but I didn't see him play them during this video, or during the other concert. A Taurus-like analog synthesizer would make an awesome guitar effects device, but they can't do that out-of-the-box, because they don't have a place to plug-in a replacement oscillator.

Since the 1980s, I wondered why guitar synths were designed as (mistakenly) glitchy MIDI controllers, when the guitar itself could replace the oscillator, in an analog synth, or a digital representation of one, and that would have no tracking problems at all. I thought that this was my idea, but Wikipedia now tells me that these existed in the 1070's. They are coming back in style in recent days: the guitar gets digitized, and that gets sent to a digital emulation of an analog-synth.

Filed under: Music No Comments
14May/120

Places Where I Have Been

States That I Have Lived:
Lived in States Places Where I Have Been

States Where I Have Worked:
Worked in States Places Where I Have Been

States Where I Rode Motorcycles (Florida was a scooter):
Rode in States Places Where I Have Been

States That I Have Traveled-to:
Visited States Places Where I Have Been

Countries? I've only been to the USA, Canada, and Mexico.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas        [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked] [Rode]
California      [Traveled]         [Worked]
Colorado
Connecticut     [Traveled]         [Worked]
Delaware        [Traveled]
Florida         [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked] [Rode] (scooter)
Georgia         [Traveled]
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois        [Traveled]         [Worked] [Rode]
Indiana         [Traveled]                  [Rode]
Iowa            [Traveled]
Kansas          [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked] [Rode]
Kentucky        [Traveled]
Louisiana       [Traveled]
Maine           [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked]
Maryland        [Traveled]
Massachusetts   [Traveled]         [Worked]
Michigan        [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked]
Minnesota       [Traveled]         [Worked]
Mississippi
Missouri        [Traveled]                  [Rode]
Montana
Nebraska        [Traveled]
New Hampshire   [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked]
New Jersey      [Traveled]         [Worked]
New Mexico      [Traveled]
New York        [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked]
North Carolina  [Traveled]
North Dakota
Ohio            [Traveled]         [Worked]
Oklahoma        [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked] [Rode]
Oregon
Pennsylvania    [Traveled]
Rhode Island    [Traveled]
South Carolina  [Traveled]
South Dakota
Tennessee       [Traveled]         [Worked] [Rode]
Texas           [Traveled] [Lived] [Worked] [Rode]
Utah
Vermont         [Traveled]
Virginia        [Traveled]
West Virginia   [Traveled]
Wisconsin       [Traveled]
Wyoming
Washington
Washington D.C. [Traveled]
28Feb/120

Why Creation Theory and The Theory of Evolution Are Not Remotely Similar

We hear things from fundamentalists like:

  • "Evolution is not a law, it's only a theory."
  • "Evolution is not a fact, it's only a theory."
  • "Evolution is equivalent to creation theory; they are both theories."

When creationists say things like that they are using the words "theory", "law", and "fact" in a completely different way than how scientists use those words.

Here's how Ramon Bautista explains the meaning of the scientific words:

[quote]

"Laws tell you what's happening... Theory is telling you, or at least trying to tell you, why something happens.

Example:

  • law of gravity=what goes up, must come down
  • theory of gravity=graviton

[/quote]

For scientists theories are always theories. They can never become laws, and they never become facts. That said, there has never been a single piece of evidence against the theory of evolution; and there has never been a single piece of evidence for creationism. These are very different uses of the word theory.

Frank Steiger

I discovered Frank Steiger's website only after I wrote my essay. Mr. Steiger covers the same issues— in more depth.

Filed under: 5) Other, Science No Comments
24Feb/120

Ballooning with National Champion Pat Cannon

I rode with pilot Pat Cannon during the 2001 Highland Village Balloon Festival. Mr. Cannon won the Balloon Federation of America National Championship a number of times, so this was an incredible opportunity to see just how precise balloon piloting can be.

balloon flame Edit 512x172 Ballooning with National Champion Pat Cannon

The challenge was to fly a minimum distance, and put a bean bag on a target.

We met at the event's location for the pre-flight pilot meeting. Balloons are best-piloted during early morning or early evening (the Trey Ratcliff hours), so this was very early in the day.

We participated in the First Flight Ceremony. In my case this involved the pilot saying some words, and pouring champagne on my hair, but I observed other folks participating in another secret version. 1%-ers have nothing on balloonists.

We drove to the location, unfolded the balloon, and filled it with hot air (see image above). A number of other pilots followed our chase vehicle, and began their flights from nearby (see image below), but there was nothing special about that location piloting-accuracy-wise. Mr. Cannon chose that location because that's where he wanted to land at the end of the event. The location chosen was a new development under-construction. The roads where there, and were free of debris, but construction had not yet begun on any of the homes. We used one of the roads like a heliport.

balloons Edit 512x182 Ballooning with National Champion Pat Cannon

Before preparing to take off, the pilot launched a small black helium balloon called a pie-ball. He used a sextant to follow the pie-ball, and estimated the wind's speed and direction at various altitudes. (My Google-fu tells me that "pie-ball" is short for "pilot-balloon".)

The pilot steers the balloon by choosing a direction, and then going to the altitude who's wind is blowing in that direction. The balloon requires a certain amount of time to get to any chosen altitude, so the pilot needs to plan for that, and the intervening wind vectors, at each step.

Before leaving the pilot told me that we were going to:

  1. Fly over Lake Lewisville
  2. Make a 90-degree direction-change over the lake
  3. Fly to the target, which was here, and then
  4. Fly back to our starting place.

That's exactly what he did:

  1. We flew a right-triangle
  2. Mr. Pat Cannon tossed his bean bag within 2-feet of the target's center and then
  3. We then returned to the chase vehicle. No chasing required.

 

My legs were shaking uncontrollably during the first half of the trip. I have an extreme fear of heights. Motorcycle riding in bad weather has helped me cure much of that since then, but I don't avoid an activity just because it makes me uncomfortable. That's core to who I am.

One amazing thing about ballooning is that you can hear everything on the ground. Your vehicle is travelling at exactly the speed of the wind. Sound is as clear as if their were no wind at all.

People run out of their houses to see the balloon. This is early morning, so they are half-dressed. They notice that the pilot can see them in their night-wear and then run back into their houses.

Boaters were also on the lake to see the balloons. Pat Cannon brought his basket down to visit some boaters. He was able to have the bottom of the basket skim the water, but our feet never got wet, and I never saw any water on the basket floor. Another balloonist attempted to do that too, and his basket immediately laid-down on its side in the water; he, and his passengers did get wet. icon smile Ballooning with National Champion Pat Cannon

Are angry landowners a risk when landing? Yes. Pat Cannon told me about a landowner that started shooting his balloon as he flew over the shooter's property. He was not even trying to land there. Mr. Cannon was well-prepared with the two-way radios that pilot's use, a GPS, and even a mobile phone. The shooter was surprised when the police arrived at the scene. (Robert Munafo told me that people like to shoot trains too.)

Pilot Pat Cannon is an extremely skilled pilot. He has most of the existing pilot endorsements. He flew helicopters for the US Army during the Vietnam War. He is a FAA safety examiner, and he regularly flies Mitsubishi MU-2s for Turbine Aircraft Services, Inc. where he is a Principal.

Private
%d bloggers like this: