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9Dec/070

Are emergency rooms really that big a drag on the medical system?

Originally published on Dec 9, 2012, but then sent back in time.

My how things have changed since I wrote this essay in 2009. Governor Romney pandered to the voters in the 2012 Presidential Election—by continuously insulted the President of the United States for adopting a national health care plan—that is almost exactly like Governor Romney's plan for Massachusetts. Massachusetts' plan works, and Romney knows it; that's why he signed-it, and that's why it the United States adopted it.

Our country has adopted Governor Romney's and Massachusetts' health care plan, and Governor Romney pandered to the Republican voters by insulting the

This is a new version of my contributions to Are emergency rooms really that big a drag on the medical system? on The Straight Dope board (A message board for fans of The Straight Dope).  I highly recommend The Straight Dope.   If your favorite newspaper doesn't carry it, then go here. Everyone knows Snopes.com. The Straight Dope has a different purpose, but it is Snopes equal in the fight against ignorance.

Emergency rooms shouldn't be free, but they must help everyone, and some never pay the bill. If a patient doesn't pay her bill, then who ends up paying it? The hospital does at first, but ultimately we all do. As Shodan said, "If you are mandated to treat everyone whether they can pay or not, you have to charge those who pay more to cover for those who don't." We now have a national health care system without a detailed policy for those that cannot pay. The patients, the insurance companies, and the Physicians have little means of controlling those costs.

I was in poverty for many years. I am certainly not against care for the poor. Being "against" national health care is meaningless. We have had it for some time (whether we are talking about Medicaid, Medicare, or yes, those that simply don't pay). The question is whether we want control over what is happening, or not, and "not" is just bad business.

How bad is the problem? Go here to read Malcolm Gladwell's Million Dollar Murray. Here is a teaser quote: "Culhane estimates that in New York at least sixty-two million dollars was being spent annually to shelter just those twenty-five hundred hard-core homeless."

Being against national health care is unreasonable. We have it, we just do it really badly. Lets stop doing it badly.

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